• Melanie Evans

7 Dated Home Decor Trends Homebuyers Don't Want to See

The world of home decor is fickle, and trends come and go. And often what was trending on Instagram a year ago is now considered something of a nightmare at worst and dated at best.


If you are selling your Waterloo Region home, home decor counts for a lot, and even if they are not permanent fixtures in your home, and could be relatively easily changed by new owners, dated, or downright jarringly and, home decor is hard for them to see past. And as many are looking for a home that is as 'move in ready' as possible it can have a doubly negative effect.


While there are plenty of examples of home decor that homesellers should consider retiring, all of the following are some of the worst that we've seen in 2022 that should be avoided.


The 'Modern Farmhouse' Look




Many designers have urged that the modern farmhouse trend be put to pasture. Overly distressed and white-washed furniture and accessories, kitschy signs like "live, laugh, love," or "gather," shiplap walls, faux barn doors, an abundance of burlap or buffalo check, and mason jars are all part of this now very passe style.


Keeping a few genuinely antique accents from the look is OK, but going overboard with modern farmhouse furnishings could make your house look dated and unappealing to potential buyers.


Vessel Bowl Sinks




These sinks are usually found on bathroom vanities, but they are occasionally seen in kitchens as well. They may be a round bowl or a modern square and made from granite, marble or copper. They were originally favored because it was felt that they added a distinctive alternative to the usual undermount sink, perhaps great for upgrading an antiquated bathroom.


However, they are no longer considered as attractive and can be difficult to clean and maintain. Between the vessel sink's base and the countertop, water and debris can become trapped and mould and mildew can form fast.


Additionally, the exposed sink edges are vulnerable to damage and cracks and sharper ones can pose a safety hazard to kids (and clumsier adults) that many would be buyers do not want to deal with. They are also far from sturdy, none of which makes them as appealing to homebuyers as you might think.


Cows and Cowhide




A cowhide rug has gained popularity over the past ten years as the pinnacle of contemporary decor. However, animal prints are becoming increasingly out of style. As ornamental jagged edge carpets in black and white or brown and white, the cow print aesthetic had surfaced as 'modern chic' but if it ever was, that's no longer the case.


The floor was not the only place that cowhide has been used often either. Kitchen stools and statement chairs with cowhide design were popular for several years. Cows have also inspired works of art, such as the widely dispersed long-haired Highland Cow print. Cowhide prints were rated as one of the worst interior design trends ever in a UK study by the magazine Ideal Home.


If you will be selling your home - or even just want your home to look stylish in 2023 - consider other approaches to incorporating the popular white and black color scheme that don't involve drawing inspiration from cows.


Rainfall Showerheads




These showerheads have been used frequently to supposedly turn owner's bathroom suites into luxurious spas. But because these showerheads are not so useful, or enjoyble to use, after all, the excitement surrounding them is beginning to fade.


When utilizing most rainfall showerheads, the abundance of water is not like that of a natural shower in the rainforest, as promised in the marketing literature (and we're not sure those really exist anyway). Instead, a trickle of water cascades down in a way that is less than welcoming and more like having a bucket of water repeatedly dumped over your head. Additionally, because rain showerheads tend to have a broader head, they frequently have lower water pressure.


Tile Countertops




In the 1970s and 1980s, square tile counters were extremely popular in kitchens and bathrooms. According to a study conducted by the home furnishings firm Empire Today, they are currently regarded as one of the worst home décor trends of the previous 50 years. Tile is prone to chipping and grout cleaning can be laborious to say the least. Today, granite and quartz are the preferred materials for countertops by far and that's usually what excites homebuyers.


We do, however, encourage homeowners to make an attempt to restore their worn-out tiled tops so that they at least complement more unconventional house designs, such as by painting the grout lines in striking hues like moss green, yellow, brilliant blue, or peach. But if they can be replaced that's usually the best way to go (even if you are not planning on selling your home just yet).


Maintaining an Indoor Jungle




Green has dominated this year in the world of home decor. Almost every paint company decided on a green hue for their 2022 color of the year. Homeowners were encouraged to add greenery everywhere, even in the form of hanging plants from light fittings and enormous planters set atop dining room tables or on each shelf in the kitchen, home office, or bathroom. Even worse, the worst trend from last year is still prevalent: moss walls.


All of these enormous forms of foliage may make home images on Instagram look amazing, but you might have surrounded yourself with too much green in real life. Grab a machete, and use it to carve a path through the dense forest. Although we adore greenery, your home doesn't always need to be covered in it everywhere. You've gone too far if the dining table has a huge plant that blocks your view or your home office looks like Dr Livingstone might be hiding in there somewhere!


The Cloffice




In a sudden culture of working from home, the pandemic-inspired trend of converting closets into home offices appeared like a feasible answer. These little decked-out offices were all the rage on social media, with homeowners showcasing them in their droves.


Everything in the closet was taken out, and the walls were lined with vivacious, vibrant wallpaper. The fact that you were still working in a closet was attempted to be concealed by open shelving, an abundance of accessories, and plants.


Now though, homeowners are emerging from hiding after too many months of seclusion. They would rather have a dedicated workspace with more space and light that can be used in a more traditional manner for occasional work. Additionally, now that they have truly returned to the office, they really want to take back their closets and extra storage space for all of the clothes they purchased to do so. And even those who have embraced remote work permanently want a real office space, not a closet.



5 views0 comments